Researchers To Enhance Security Of Next-Generation Wireless Systems – Texas A&M University Today

 
Guofei Gu, professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at Texas A&M University, is the lead principal investigator of a research team that has received a $1 million grant from the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Resilient and Intelligent Next-Generation Systems (RINGS) program to enhance the security of future wireless and mobile network systems.
The RINGS program seeks to ensure the security and resiliency of next-generation (NextG) wireless and mobile communication, sensing, computing and networking systems that will support essential services.
NextG systems are expected to connect billions of Internet of Things devices and users, and provide personalized computational and storage resources for highly critical data in real time with little delay. In order to host so many application services, NextG will use edge computing, which refers to computing services that are physically located near the user or source of the data instead of miles away at the core of a traditional cloud data system. This way, the corresponding device can provide quick responses. For example, future autonomous vehicles may require NextG to support application services to perform computations, store and process critical data from their various sensors, manage vehicle-to-vehicle communications and run their deep-learning algorithms.
To ensure that the billions of NextG-supported services remain scalable and reliable, it will feature microservice architecture, which is composed of a single application or service divided into smaller, independent processes (microservices) that each has a specific purpose. They are reusable and can be made quickly to meet demand. In addition, if a single microservice fails, it will not cause the entire application or service to crash.
However, existing microstructure architecture is not typically developed and deployed with built-in security measures. While basic security patches are available on demand to add after the fact, they are not enough to support the large volumes of critical services that NextG hosts.
To address these issues, the team has proposed to develop a new framework, NextSec, to transform the microservices into self-protecting entities that can do security enhancement protection on their own using the concept of security transformation. In addition to security transformation, NextSec also provides new primitives for supporting a software-defined way of enforcing user-to-edge-to-cloud security and offers efficient, scalable verification of complex security properties across microservices.
“NextSec is an ambitious attempt to build revolutionary capabilities for securing critical services in NextG, as well as generic edge and cloud computing,” said Gu. “This project will provide a solid foundation and collaborative community for future system and network security research.”
The co-principal investigators on the project include associate professor Jeff Huang and assistant professor Chia-Che Tsai from the computer science and engineering department and Walter Magnussen, director of the Texas A&M Internet2 Technology Evaluation Center.
For the RINGS program, the NSF partners with the U.S. Department of Defense’s Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering, the National Institute of Standards and Technology and several industry partners such as Apple, Ericsson, Google, IBM, Intel, Microsoft, Nokia, Qualcomm and VMware.
This article by Stephanie Jones originally appeared on the College of Engineering website.
Texas A&M researchers have identified the properties needed to prove that bitcoin and other related cryptographic protocols are secure and safe to use.
Texas A&M researchers have designed mechanisms to counter the vulnerabilities in push-notification based systems.
After a significant increase in the number of cyberattacks this year, Texas A&M experts explain what malware is and what can be done to better protect these systems from future attacks.
A series of 100-degree days have created worsening conditions for livestock and crop producers across the state, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service agents report.
Texas A&M experts Casey Papovich reacts to the “awe-inspiring” scenes of the universe captured by the NASA telescope.
Galveston Professor Sam Brody testified in support of reauthorizing the National Flood Insurance Program.
Subscribe to the Texas A&M Today newsletter for the latest news and stories every week.

source

Share:

More Posts

Market Research

Pulse Surveys

Turn feedback into action

Our survey platform makes it easy to measure and understand feedback so you can drive growth and innovation

Pulse Handshak

Pulse Handshak

Collaborative online survey tool for the market research industry. Remote assisted surveying just like face-to-face interviews. Here interviewers can talk to the respondent over the web-console without the need for any other communication channel and share the same Q're with responses and click actions.

Pulse FE

Pulse FE

Pulse Field Expert or Pulse FE is the main platform for both offline and online survey at softofficepro.com. It is robust and used by hundreds of clients over tens of years with millions of responses. Do it once Q're and deploy on both offline devices (android) and online forms makes it a great cost effective platform for any kind of responses

Pulse Ultimate

Pulse Ultimate

Pulse Ultimate is targeted for tracking studies and retail audits. An offline survey system offering extreme field control including processes like data quality check, back-check, rework, comparison with previous wave data etc. helps to get the best results on a day-to-day basis

Pulse LS

Pulse LS

Use a managed Limesurvey and our expertise for creating complex forms and token based user management. Use optional mailing system to send survey invitation to each participant and track progress of the response status. Industry standard SPSS / R output supported